Places still available on the following CPD courses in 2014:

Writers on Writing Seminar Series: Adam Phillips in Conversation
with Dr David Hewison on ‘Writing Psychoanalysis’

5 December 2014, 18:30 – 20:30 

Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips, one of Britain’s most elegant and original prose stylists, in conversation with Dr David Hewison. In his brilliant career, Adam Phillips has lent a new and creative dimension to the art of creative non-fiction.

Fee:  £59

Book now

The Psychodynamic Context of Psychosexual Therapy
12 December 2014, 10:00 – 16:00 

Psychosexual therapy involves far more than behavioural exercises and history taking. This workshop will address the relevance of psychodynamic theory to our understanding of the role of therapy for sexual difficulties. This workshop will be of interest to anyone working in the field, such as counsellors, GPs, psychotherapists and social workers.

Fee:  £115

Book now

New CPD courses for 2015:

Enid Balint Lecture 2015 ‘Beating the Bounds: A Clinical
Investigation into the Psychoanalytic Frame’

6 February 2015, 18:30 – 20:30 

Dr Robin Anderson, a training analyst in adult, child and adolescent analysis at the British Psychoanalytical Society uses the ancient English custom of the ‘Beating the Bounds’ procession as an analogy for both an external and internal setting and argues that Freud’s original intuitive choice of the analytic setting tapped into something pre-existing in the human psyche.

Fee:  £40

Book now

One-day Workshop: ‘Home is Where the Therapy is? Reflecting on the Issues of Identity for Psychotherapists Working in Another Country’

7 February 2015, 10:00 – 16:00 

In this workshop we will be exploring the ways in which a therapist’s sense of identity and belonging is impacted by working in a non-native environment and (perhaps) in an acquired language. In particular, this workshop will address the various aspects of the therapists’ clinical dilemmas in the context of working away from their place of cultural and linguistic origin.

Fee:  £125 (£115 if booked and paid for by 19 December, 2014)

Book now

TCCR Study Day: The Importance of Grandparents

13 February 2015, 10:00 – 16:00 

This conference examines the enduring importance and influence of grandparents who play such a key role both in the external and internal worlds of their children, grandchildren, and sometimes also of succeeding generations.

Fee:  £125 (£115 if booked and paid for by 2 January, 2015)

Book now

Places available on our professional courses in psychosexual studies:

Learn more about the sexual relationship with our
Psychosexual Certificate

Course starts January 2015

The course focuses on thinking about couples and sex and applying this understanding to participants’ work. It is useful for GPs, sexual health workers and other healthcare professionals as well as counsellors and psychotherapists, who will find the course offers practical informative ways of addressing the sexual relationship.

Find out more

MSc in Psychosexual and Relationship Therapy

Course starts January 2015

Qualifies you to practice as a psychosexual therapist in statutory and voluntary sectors as well as in private practice. The course is COSRT approved and UEL validated and graduates may be eligible for individual registration with UKCP.

Find out more

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Professional Standards Authority (PSA) accreditation

Dear Colleagues

We are very pleased to announce that the BPC has now been accredited by the Professional Standards Authority(PSA) under its Accredited Registers programme. The process has taken many months since we started our application late last year – but now we are through. This work was led by our Head of Services, Janice Cormie, and we would like to thank Janice for the tremendous work she has put into achieving our accreditation.
This was a joint application with the Association of Child Psychotherapists (ACP), and our joint accreditation strengthens the relationship between our organisations and enhances our effectiveness in the external world.
We have been assured that the PSA will work to ensure that NHS commissioners, employers and members of the public are made aware of the programme, so that they will seek to refer to and employ individuals who are on an accredited register. We have arranged with them that they will circulate the news of our accreditation to their list of Clinical Commissioning Groups and other stakeholders, alongside our own news distributions.
BPC registrants and MIs can now start using the Accredited Register logo on their websites and in print materials. Details about accreditation and how to use the logo are contained in the attached document. If you have any specific queries, please contact Janice at janice@psychoanalytic-council.org
Gary and Julian

Gary Fereday
Chief Executive
Julian Lousada
Chair

British Psychoanalytic Council
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Unit 7
19-23 Wedmore Street
London N19 4RU
United Kingdom

Enid Balint Lecture 2015 ‘Beating the Bounds: A Clinical Investigation into the Psychoanalytic Frame’

New CPD courses for 2015:

Enid Balint Lecture 2015 ‘Beating the Bounds: A Clinical
Investigation into the Psychoanalytic Frame’

6 February 2014, 18:30 – 20:30 

Dr Robin Anderson, a training analyst in adult, child and adolescent analysis at the British Psychoanalytical Society uses the ancient English custom of the ‘Beating the Bounds’ procession as an analogy for both an external and internal setting and argues that Freud’s original intuitive choice of the analytic setting tapped into something pre-existing in the human psyche.

Fee:  £40

Book now

One-day Workshop: ‘Home is Where the Therapy is? Reflecting on the Issues of Identity for Psychotherapists Working in Another Country’

7 February 2014, 10:00 – 16:00 

In this workshop we will be exploring the ways in which a therapist’s sense of identity and belonging is impacted by working in a non-native environment and (perhaps) in an acquired language. In particular, this workshop will address the various aspects of the therapists’ clinical dilemmas in the context of working away from their place of cultural and linguistic origin.

Fee:  £125 (£115 if booked and paid for by 19 December, 2014)

Book now

Places are still available on the following CPD courses:

Writers on Writing Seminar Series: Adam Phillips in Conversation
with Professor Brett Kahr on ‘Writing Psychoanalysis’

5 December 2014, 18:30 – 20:30 

Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips, one of Britain’s most elegant and original prose stylists, in conversation with Professor Brett Kahr. In his brilliant career, Adam Phillips has lent a new and creative dimension to the art of creative non-fiction.

Fee:  £59

Book now

The Psychodynamic Context of Psychosexual Therapy
12 December 2014, 10:00 – 16:00 

Psychosexual therapy involves far more than behavioural exercises and history taking. This workshop will address the relevance of psychodynamic theory to our understanding of the role of therapy
for sexual difficulties. This workshop will be of interest to anyone working in the field, such as counsellors, GPs, psychotherapists
and social workers.

Fee:  £115

Book now

Learn more about the sexual relationship with our
Psychosexual Certificate

Course starts January 2015

The course focuses on thinking about couples and sex and applying this understanding to participants’ work. It is useful for GPs, sexual health workers and other healthcare professionals as well as counsellors and psychotherapists, who will find the course offers practical informative ways of addressing the sexual relationship.

Book now

Adoptive parents need to be supported to help their child grieve for the past

Full article HERE

 Devon Adoption on how they won local authority adoption team of the year

Devon adoption
The team at a recent event, where they planted 150 daffodils to represent the children waiting to be adopted in Devon at any one time. Photograph: Devon Adoption

The government’s reforms to adoption have been a challenge to many local authorities. The emphasis has been primarily on the numbers of adopters recruited and numbers of children placed in adoptive homes. As resources have become more constrained, there is less reflection and emphasis on the work done with children and adopters.

At Devon Adoption, we recently won an award from the British Association of Adoption and Fostering as local authority adoption team of the year. This was due to our emphasis on services designed for children to support any insecurities that may arise during the critical transition from foster care to adoptive home.

Children in the adoptive system will have suffered separation, loss and trauma. The child’s “journey” through this process is explained first to adopters and then to children, when they reach maturity, through court reports produced by social workers. The creation of a “life story” book with this information in can help the child understand what has happened to them, where they have lived, who has cared for them and the decisions that have happened in their lives.

Just over 18 months ago we set up a small team to complete life story books, develop child appreciation days and provide birth family support.

However, adopters thought that the books were “too special”, and that they contained information that needed to be given at different times in the child’s life. Children found the book difficult to use on a daily basis. Older teenagers and adopted adults told us they liked the books as it made them feel that someone had cared enough to complete them, but that in reality they were kept on high shelves and out of reach in their adoptive homes.

As a result, the team now completes two books, the “special one”, and another where they segment the child’s story into bite-size laminated books. The child can pick up the book when they want and chat about the story or people within it. If they want they can get angry with the book, and draw on or damage it. Adopters can attend workshops to update the story and write the next chapter.

The adoption team also devise story books in which the child is represented as an animal, such as a penguin or bear, with their own story told through the animal’s eyes. This use of the third person helps the child be one step removed from their story. The team also use this work with children who have global developmental delay as it simplifies the story. When the time comes to move to an adoption placement, the animal can be used to explain what is happening.

The move to an adoptive home can be overwhelming for a child. In some cases the child will miss the foster carer’s pet and other foster children and may not want to leave. Within this move the emphasis is usually on the new “forever family”, and the child’s grief sometimes goes unrecognised. At Devon, the team does small things to try and make a difference; such as framing pictures of the foster carer’s dog or compiling DVDs of them together. Children and adopters are encouraged to meet with foster carers after placement to show the child they are well.

All of this gives the child permission to move on with attachments and reassure them that people in their lives have not disappeared. Without this, the foster family are again a family that the child has been removed from, however positive their time with them was. Workers also support birth families which allows for a less adversarial and more trusting relationship.

To recognise and acknowledge the trauma, separation and loss that birth families are feeling, similar examples are used such as framed hand prints of the parents and child. Birth families can be left without any update on how their child is adjusting until the usual annual letter is sent. Adopters are encouraged to produce a “how are we getting on” letter to birth families and foster carers when the child has been in placement for a few months. These methods allows for better conversations and sharing of information across the complex relationships between the adults within adoption. We do not yet know whether this approach will make a difference in longer term relationships with birth families but remain hopeful.

Child appreciation days for all children over three, two life story books and workshops are a challenge for resources. But by supporting the adopters to help the child grieve for the past, it may support better future relationships and is one of the vital components of successful early adoption placement.

The leadership, learning and development hub is funded by Skills for Care. All content is editorially independent except for pieces labelled advertisement feature. Find out more here.

Why not join our social care community? Becoming a member of the Guardian Social Care Network means you get sent weekly email updates on policy and best practice in the sector, as well as exclusive offers. You can sign up – for free – online here.

 

PTSD & Attachment Theory

London, 22 November 2014 (Saturday)
10:00AM – 4:00PM
King’s College, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH

This practical workshop, led by Dr Felicity de Zulueta – one of UK’s leading experts on PTSD and complex PTSD – begins by discussing the latest diagnostic criteria for simple PTSD, and its dissociative manifestations, otherwise known as complex PTSD as they are presented in the new DSM V. She  follows on  by showing how an  understanding of PTSD and complex PTSD from an attachment perspective, allows one to make sense of both the psychological and somatic  symptoms clients/ patients  present with as well as the recent epigenetic findings relating to transmission of PTSD down the generations  and the links with borderline personality disorder and other dissociative  disorders.

 

By blending her clinical experience with Attachment research, Dr Zulueta outlines the process by which psychotherapeutically trained practitioners can assess and prepare traumatised clients for the ‘journey of therapy‘ whilst bearing in mind their need for emotional regulation and a sense of security. The workshop discusses different therapeutic approaches to stabilisation & treatment of PTSD and the way severe traumatic attachments can lead to resistance to change. Viewing the assessment and treatment of PTSD through the lens of Attachment Theory, the workshop helps practitioners understand how a rupture in the capacity to attune is fundamental to our understanding of traumatised individuals, while also providing practical new approaches to therapy for both complex and developmental PTSD.

 

 

London, 29 November 2014 (Saturday)
10:00AM – 4:00PM
Ambassadors Bloomsbury,12 Upper Woburn Place, 
London, WC1H 0HX

As practising therapists and counsellors, we witness the impact of calls for bodily transformations, enhancements and ‘perfectibility‘ in the consulting room. Our clients may not be consulting us on body troubles, but whatever their emotional predicaments and conflicts, concern for the body is nearly always folded into them. At this intellectually stimulating and practical seminar, Susie Orbach explores our challenges as therapists in a culture where the individual is deemed accountable for his or her body and judged by it. She contends that the body itself has grown as complicated a place as sexuality was for Freud. It too is shaped and misshaped by our earliest encounters with parents and carers, who also contain in themselves the representations of culture, with its multitude of injunctions about how the body should appear and be attended to. Relying on a psychoanalytic and developmental approach and drawing on findings from the labs of neuro-psychoanalysts and neuro-psychologists, Susie looks closely at the implications for our therapeutic interactions and explains starting points for a theory of body development which are just as compelling as our existing theories of the mind.

 

 

questions about these workshops & seminars? Call us at: + 44 20 3290 5622 or write to: helen.smith@nscience.co.uk

 

Sexuality in Winnicottian Thought

6:00PM – 9:00PM
John Adams Hall, 15-23 Endsleigh St, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0DP

Neither British object relations in general nor Winnicott in particular is immediately associated with a major clinical focus on sexuality and its place in human difficulty & disturbance. And yet, Winnicott’s attention to sexuality – specifically, infantile sexuality – links his ideas inextricably with Freud and to a psychoanalysis located in the drives. Winnicott’s views on sexuality particularly draw attention to the fact that infantile sexuality gains significance only after a baby comes to a realization of a world outside itself; and the limits imposed by that world. At this practically oriented seminar which would be especially relevant for psychoanalysts, psychotherapists and psychologists, Professor Lesley Caldwell helps us comprehend:

 

  • Winnicott’s overall account of human subjectivity
  • His clinical vignettes of psychosexual development and
  • His choices in approaching this material

 

Overall, the seminar argues for our attention as therapists to sexuality and its manifestations in the consulting room.

 

Lesley Caldwell is Honorary Professor at the Psychoanalysis Unit, UCL where she teaches and supervises on the Masters and doctoral programmes while coordinating the Unit’s Interdisciplinary programme. She is a psychoanalyst in private practice and former Chair of the Winnicott Trust (2008 to 2012). As editor of the Winnicott Studies monograph series for the Squiggle Foundation (Karnac), she produced four volumes: Art, Creativity, Living (2000), The Elusive Child (2002), Sex and Sexuality Winnicottian Perspectives (2005), Winnicott and the Psychoanalytic Tradition (2007). With Angela Joyce she is the author ofReading Winnicott (Routledge, 2011) and General Editor, with Helen Taylor Robinson, of the Collected Works of Donald Winnicott (OUP, 2015).

 

Seminar Schedule

 

6:00PM: Session 1:

The beginnings of self: an introduction

 

In this first session of the evening, we discuss:

 

  • Winnicott’s account of the acquisition of the self
  • his insistence that sexuality assumes the central place ascribed to it by Freud only after the child’s rudimentary awareness of the beginnings of self

 

6:45PM: Session 2: Infantile and childhood sexuality 

 

Building on our comprehension from Session 1, we look at clinical examples from Winnicott’s case vignettes and discuss how these illustrate:

 

  • the sexuality of the child and the importance of the relationship with parents
  • how childhood history is formative of the child’s internalization of sexual impulses

 

7:15PM: Coffee Break


7:45PM: Session 3: Adult sexuality 

In this session, we focus on an extract from the extensive case history ‘Holding and Interpretation‘ and consider:

 

  • the use of interpretations that focus on the Oedipus complex and
  • Winnicott’s patient’s growing capacity to deal with relationships with real persons (and with his analyst as a real person)

 

8:15PM: Session 4: Winnicott & new family forms

 

Drawing on our understanding from previous sessions, the last session uses the Winnicottian approach in comprehending & working with with some of the ‘different‘ family forms and different reproductive possibilities our clients may be part of.

 

Clinical material for the sessions on infant and child sexuality and on adult sexuality will be made available.

 

9:00PM: Close

 

BOOK ONLINE

 

questions about the seminar? Call us at: + 44 20 3290 5622 or write to:helen.smith@nscience.co.uk